Traumatized Worker Syndrome

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CHRIS HEDGES: Hi, I’m Chris Hedges. Welcome to Days of Revolt. Today we're going to carry out part two of my discussion about where we’re headed economically, with economist Michael Hudson. He’s worked on Wall Street, taught economics, and is the author of Killing the Host: How Financial Parasites and Debt Destroy the Global Economy. Welcome, Michael. (Part One - The inversion of Classical Economics) MICHAEL HUDSON: It’s good to be here. HEDGES: So, we spoke in the first segment about the parasitic quality of the banks, hedge funds and the speculative class that has in essence cannibalized the country – including, interestingly, industry itself, and forced down the throats of the American public an unsustainable debt peonage, whether that’s through student loans, ...

The inversion of Classical Economics

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Days of Revolt: How We Got to Junk Economics In this episode of teleSUR's Days of Revolt, Chris Hedges interviews economist Michael Hudson on the history of classical economics and explores Marx's interpretation of capitalism as exploitation -   March 22, 2016 CHRIS HEDGES: Hi, I'm Chris Hedges. Welcome to Days of Revolt. Today in a two-part series we're going to be discussing a great Ponzi scheme that not only defines not only the U.S. but the global economy, how we got there, in the first segment, and secondly, where we're going. And with me to discuss this issue is the economist Michael Hudson, author of Killing the Host: How Financial Parasites and Debt Destroy the Global Economy. A professor of economics ...

Smart Parasites

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An interview with the Extra Environmentalists on the concepts behind Killing the Host. The episode is entitled the Age of Stagnation. Friends may appreciate a new higher quality audio recording, thanks to the Extra Environmentalists, who donated a microphone. They write: The common political conversation about our shared economic future focuses on achieving an escape velocity where the post-war growth boom can return as usual. While years of lackluster economic performance mount, a rapidly growing global economy is still discussed like it is readily just over the horizon. Can the factors creating a slower growth world find open discussion in time to avoid severe social strife? Is the drive for passive income in an age of stagnation placing the ...